Navigon

Navigon is a Germany based producer of geospatial data infrastructure, starting out in 1991. With offices in Asia, Europe, and North America, the company employs more than 400 people. Navigon introduced several statistics for spatial data firsts into the world of geographic data technologies. In 2000, for example, public geodata service helped Navigon to be launched as the first navigation software to be used on the pocket PC. In 2002, Navigon was the first to provide Traffic Message Channel (TMC) avoidance measures on a sat nav. With Navigon’s seamless interface, it is easy to search for addresses of businesses you are interested in and receive precise driving or walking directions. A novel feature that every gambler will surely love is Navigno’s unique casino search function. Wherever you are in Europe, you can easily find the nearest casino and get the exact instructions on reaching it. Before heading into one, however, practice playing online first. You can find the best Quickspin online casinos on casinosfranceenligne.com that have free play options ready for you to explore.

The Traffic Message Channel is basically a hidden code embedded into a normal FM radio signal, digitally encoded and picked up by the navigation device, alerting the user to potential traffic black spots.

TomTom Geographic Data Technologies

TomTom is a Dutch manufacturer of automotive navigation systems, or sat navs to be used in the car. The company was founded in 1991 and sold business applications such as geographic data science, meter readers and barcode readers up until 1996 when the company started delving into PDA and spatial data infrastructure. The first actual sat nav was released in 2002 – the TomTom Navigator.

TomTom is certainly one of the main brand names that springs to mind when the words “sat nav” are mentioned. What we want to know is, how well does it actually perform in a working environment?
I asked a team of electricians who used the device how they felt about its effectiveness. Working on-site in numerous locations means that electricians and other contractors may use navigation devices frequently, inputting and finding their way to many different addresses, some of which will be unlisted.

The device the electricians were equipped with was the basic TomTom One which does not possess Bluetooth connectivity. One plus point with the TomTom would be the ability to change the voice that barks out the directions at you. If the user gets fed up of the current voice they can change the accent (the favourite being the Australian), whether or not it’s male or female, or even the language itself.